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Check these things on your AEG! | Fox Airsoft

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This article is here to help new players who have just purchased an AEG and are going out to play for the first time. We want to show you some key systems inside your electric gun and how you should inspect them so that you can enjoy your AEG for a long long time. We will be using an ICS Peleador for this demonstration, which covers many M4-style guns out there however much of this info pertains to other AEGs as well.

Let's start out with the electrical system because this is where most people get stuck. First we have to make sure your gun gets power from the battery. If your gun has a fuse, this is the first area we will check. On our example gun. we will use an ICS Peleador. Many guns come with fuses though some might not. If you do not have one, skip this step. Fuses come in capsule or blade style. They both do the same thing and offer the same level of protection, just in a different shape.. The ICS has a blade type fuse. What you will want to inspect is that there are no burns or scorches or breaks in the piece in the middle. The fuse is tripped when there is suddenly too much draw, either due to damage in the gun or a short in the system somewhere. The fuse is there to prevent damage from attempted use during these conditions. Sometimes the fuse itself may go bad or may be rated too low for the realistic demand of the gun so they can blow and simply replacing them will be the end of your problems. These cost a few cents so it is helpful to carry spares. Also using the correct rated fuse is important, otherwise you will be blowing them at the slightest use. Run a 25 or 30 amp fuse but do not exceed this. The other type of fuse is a capsule type which will have the same available ratings as the blade type. These require both ends of the connector to be secure inside the housing. These can be prone to getting loose if you move around the wires too much. If your fuse is intact but your gun does not function, we can move on to other areas we may have to trouble shoot. If your fuses keep blowing it may be a sign of something gone wrong inside the gun.

The next section of the electrical system you should check before going out there is your battery connectors. For guns with Tamiya style plugs, do the plugs snap together easily? Are they burnt or discolored? A sign of trouble for your gun is if these plugs get melted or the wires and plugs getting hot. This would be your queue to stop using it and seek help. Over time the prongs inside these plugs can get bent or worn out, making them more difficult to connect. Eventually the plug itself may need to be replaced so keep an eye on that. If things look normal here then we can move on.

The wires should be treated with care especially when installing the battery in the gun. You can accidentally cut open a wire simply by closing the stock incorrectly. Cut wires could result in short circuits which cause your batteries to burn and that would be a very bad situation. Any gun that has the battery plug in the rear will have stocks that are designed to tuck the wires neatly. Just pay attention to the wires and don't crush them and you will be fine.

The last thing you could check is more for if your gun were to suddenly stop working. If your gun was shooting fine and all of a sudden it does not, there are a few reasons this could happen. The symptom for the scenario we are attempting to diagnose is a sudden lack of response from your AEG. You pull the trigger and you get zero response. The motor is not turning and you hear nothing at all. Unlike trying to shoot an AEG with a weak battery, having no response is not a symptom of an uncharged battery. Instead what may have happened is your motor wires coming off of the terminals on the motor. This does not happen frequently but it is possible so it should be checked. The torque from the motor moving around in the grip or loose connectors would be the cause here. To check this, simply remove the base of the motor grip and see if the wires are connected or loose. Reconnect them as needed.

By the way, the bottom of the motor grip also has a big screw in the center. Do not mess with this unless you know what you are doing. This is the motor height adjustment screw. Your motor height affects the meshing of the gears inside your gun. If you adjust it incorrectly, you can cause your gun to be noisier and not turn over as smoothly. On top of that you could wear out or damage your gears prematurely if you have it too low or too high. Having this too tight will bind your gears and you will be drawing a lot of juice from your battery, making the wires heat up and damaging other things. It takes a trained ear to tune this, but you can check it by cycling the gun and hearing how the gun sounds. If it sounds screechy or whiny, you should adjust it until the gears sound smoother. Adjustments should be minute so if you are cranking this thing by a lot you are doing something wrong.

That covers the electrical system of the gun. Next is the barrel. When you first get your new airsoft gun, no matter what kind it is, I would recommend you clean the barrel before you even use it. Why? After a gun is assembled at the factory, there is often excess greases and oils that are inside the barrel that are leftover from production that may not have got cleaned out. These guns are stored for a while as it makes its way from the factory all the way into your hands so it may be dirty even if you have never even fired the gun. Cleaning the barrel with a couple patches soaked with silicone oil and then running a dry patch through the barrel will take out the grease that could make your gun run less than optimal, or worse cause a jam.

Shop for silicone oil here!

The last thing you should check is the hop up. This is probably better done at the field. The hopup produces backspin on the BB when fired which gives you the range you need to reach out and hit someone. Getting this adjusted and dialed in will make sure you hit what you are aiming at so while you are on the field, shoot it where permitted and adjust as needed. The hopup will react differently to different weight BBs, so pick a weight you want to stick with and adjust the hopup so it shoots nice and flat for you. If you crank it up too much it can jam your gun by the way. If you are not getting any change in trajectory then your hopup might not be functioning correctly. But other than that, this is something everyone should know how to do. For an M4, you will pull back the charging handle and the hopup chamber will be exposed. Turn the dial and observe the visible changes in your trajectory in relation to your point of aim and adjust from there.

That covers the gun specific things you should check when you go play airsoft with an electric gun. We will be coming up with more tips and tricks to help you have a great time out there playing airsoft. Until next time, we will see you later.

Oh and if you are wanting to start airsofting or want to learn more, check out this section: 

Beginners click here!

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